STANDISH OF DUXBURY

6. BIOGRAPHIES

6.3. Colonel Richard [11B1] (c.1597-1662)

Helen Moorwood 2013

N.B. By clicking on the coloured title you can return to the original articles written in early 2004 and placed by Peter Duxbury on A Duxbury Family Website in March 2004, where this one still is, under:

Helen's Story: from Duxbury to Shakespeare. The story of William Shakespeare's Lancashire Ancestry, by Helen Moorwood

Colonel Richard Standish of Duxbury (c. 1597-1662)

N.B. Most of this still stands, but where appropriate the 2004 version is now updated below by interspersed commentary in square brackets and italics. There is also an update paragraph at the end. Some reformatting was necessary, and the occasional typo – whether by Peter or myself - has been silently corrected. Asap a full narrative version of his biography will appear, based, of course, on all details and documents in this file. Meanwhile, this is part (1) of (1) to (16) CR. [2013 HM]

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6.3. (1) CR Introduction(2004 & Update 2013)

Colonel Richard emerged from published Lancashire documents and as yet unpublished family papers in the Lancashire Record Office (Standish of Duxbury Muniments: LRO DP397) as a fascinating character with an eventful life, to say the least. He was not commissioned as a Colonel before 1650 (Colonel of foot for Parliament during the final stages of the Civil War) and after 1651 he was always named “Richard Standish (of Duxbury) Esquire”, but ‘Colonel’ is a useful way to distinguish him from other Richard Standishes of Duxbury in the early 17th century, including his own father and a close kinsman at Duxbury Hall. His story is essential as an explanation of so many anomalies presented by events in Duxbury in the 19th century and in 19th and 20th century published accounts of the Standishes of Duxbury (and Standish) in the 16th and 17th centuries. He even enters the story of ‘Shakespeare in Lancashire' via his parents and grandparents.  

Events in Duxbury in the 19th century included the various claims on the Duxbury Hall estates by an extraordinary number of people, ranging from the descendants of Myles Standish in America to Tom Standish the weaver from Bolton (and others), which resulted in a few rather spectacular events – particularly two ‘sieges' of Duxbury Hall. These events have been related many times in the local press and reported by later historians (start with various publications by Rev. T. C. Porteus, summarised in W. Walker, Duxbury in Decline) but without a solution of their origins.  

The most intriguing story of the 20th century was the attempt to remove Myles Standish from Duxbury and place him in the Isle of Man.  

The explanations behind the ‘true’ story lie, hardly surprisingly, mainly in the family papers: the Standish of Duxbury Muniments, from the earliest c.1220 until c.1700. None of these are more interesting than those relevant to Colonel Richard. Sooner or later these should all be fully transcribed and published. Any expectation of publication of a full transcription by me of all documents in the near future is unrealistic: this would require several years of effort and would delay the following story of Colonel Richard. I meanwhile provide all references and the documents are there, available to any visitor to the LRO.  

Until recently (writing this in March/April 2004) I was resigned to accepting the fact that I was the first person in the 20th/21st centuries to have read any of these documents in full since the day they were written and that only a handful of people in the Chorley area was interested. My main motivation was that I was fascinated by the history of the township of Duxbury, which had produced all my Duxbury ancestors, and an exploration of the history of Duxbury led inevitably to the Standishes of Duxbury, which included Myles Standish and Colonel Richard, amongst many others.   

Suddenly (early 2004), interest in Chorley exploded via the initiative of the Revd Dr John Cree, Rector of St Laurence’s, whose ambitious plans appear on the web site of St Laurence’s: www.blackburn.anglican.org/chorleystlaurence. It seemed that the time had come to try to draw together all discovered so far about Colonel Richard.  Full accounts of the catalogue of the Standish of Duxbury Muniments, a list of all Standish of Duxbury wills, admons, Inquisitions post mortem, Visitation Pedigrees, other pedigree charts and biographies of all the males of the family at Duxbury Hall (will) appear on linked sites. The main contribution so far is the biography of Alexander Standish of Duxbury (1570/1-1622) [revised to (1567-1622)], father and grandfather of several mentioned below, in the family at Duxbury Hall.  

The first and only biography of Colonel Richard to have appeared until now was by William Farrer in his section on Duxbury in the Victoria County History (Vol. 6, p. 210). He identified Richard wrongly as the third son of Thomas the MP and wrote the following:  

Richard Standish was a colonel in the Parliamentary army; Civil War Tracts, 252; Cal. Com. for Comp. I, 392, where there is a curious story of him. His will, made in 1657 (codicil 1662) and proved at York, recites the settlement of Duxbury and other manors in favour of his eldest son Richard, &c. The fine of 1655 probably relates to this settlement; Pal. of Lanc. Feet of F. bdle, 155, m. 165.  

He was relying entirely on public documents and never saw the family papers, which had disappeared from Duxbury in the 1830s and did not reappear in Lancashire until 1965.

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Update 2013

The MS referred to in “Pal. of Lanc. Feet of F. bdle, 155, m. 165” had a duplicate in the Standish of Duxbury Muniments, DP397/21/17. This was the one I called the ‘1655 Dynamite Document’ back in 2004. It remains vitally important, although the “Alexander Standish, Gent” in this document has now emerged from other records as Alexander[11A4] (1604-1662>1664) and NOT Alexander son of Myles. This part of the story therefore requires a rewrite, which duly happens when we arrive at this date. (Alexander[11A4]’s first-ever biography is now given in BIOGRAPHIES 6.4 AS Alexander[11A4].) The main significance of this document, however, remains the same, in that it lies at the heart of the explanation for all the claims on Duxbury Hall, including by Myles’s descendants, in the 19th century. This story will be told in full asap in the folder MYLES STANDISH.

Meanwhile, an anonymous reader has placed Col. Richard’s biography on Wikipedia.

Richard Standish(21 October 1621 – March 1662) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commonsin 1659 and 1660. He was a colonel in the Parliamentarianarmy in the English Civil War.

Standish was the son of Thomas Standishof Duxbury, the MP for Preston and his wife Anne Wingfield, daughter of Sir Richard Wingfield of Letheringham, Suffolk.[1]

He inherited the Manor of Duxbury and Duxbury Hallafter the death of his elder brother Alexander in 1648. In 1654, he was elected Member of Parliamentfor Lancashirein the First Protectorate Parliament. He was re-elected MP for Lancashire in 1656 for the Second Protectorate Parliament. In 1659 he was elected MP for Prestonin the Third Protectorate Parliament.[2] He was re-elected in March 1660 for Preston in the Convention Parliament, but the election was declared void on 20 June.[2]

Standish died at the age of 40. He had married Elizabeth, the daughter of Piers Legh of Lyme, Cheshire, with whom he had six sons and three daughters. His son Richardwas created a baronetin 1677.[1]

References[edit]

1.                 1 a b Townships: Duxbury, A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6 (1911), pp. 208-213. Date accessed: 06 January 2011

2.                 2 a b History of Parliament Online - Standish, Richard

"STANDISH, Richard (1621-62), of Duxbury, Standish, Lancs.". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 2013-01-10.

This page was last modified on 8 June 2013 at 08:11.

I accessed it on 12 June 2013. I wonder who had modified it 4 days earlier? Probably not even Wikileaks will reveal their name. It should, of course, be corrected initially as follows, with edits in red. (I have never entered the world of editing Wikipedia biographies.)

Richard Standish(c.1597 – March 1662) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commonsin 1654, 1656, 1659 and 1660. He was a colonel in the Parliamentarianarmy in the English Civil War.

Standish was the son of Richard Standish of Manchester, of a junior branch of the family of Standish of Duxbury, and Elizabeth, daughter of Piers Legh X of Lyme, son and heir of Sir Piers Legh IX of Lyme.

He was awarded the Manor of Duxbury and Duxbury Hallafter the death of his distant cousin Alexander (a Colonel in the Royalist army) in 1647 by his widow Margaret. In 1654, he was elected Member of Parliamentfor Lancashirein the First Protectorate Parliament. He was re-elected MP for Lancashire in 1656 for the Second Protectorate Parliament. In 1659 he was elected MP for Prestonin the Third Protectorate Parliament.[2] He was re-elected in March 1660 for Preston in the Convention Parliament, but the election was declared void on 20 June.[2]

Standish died at the age of about 65. He had first married (in 1625) Ellen Lees of Middleton, with whom he had seven children, but Ellen had died by 1646/7 and all their children had died by 1651, some of them perhaps in an outbreak of the plague in Manchester. He married secondly (in 1647) Elizabeth Legh, the daughter of Piers Legh, Esq. of Lyme, Cheshire, with whom he had six sons and three daughters. His son Richardwas created a baronetin 1677.[1]

1 a b Townships: Duxbury, A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6 (1911), pp. 208-213.

2 a b History of Parliament Online - Standish, Richard

"STANDISH, Richard (1-62), of Duxbury, Standish, Lancs.". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 2013-01-10.

We will follow up this last reference when we reach his Parliamentary career in the 1650s.

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